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J Nutr Biochem. 2011 May;22(5):502-10. doi: 10.1016/j.jnutbio.2010.04.006.

Dietary soy and tea mitigate chronic inflammation and prostate cancer via NFκB pathway in the Noble rat model.

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  • 1Department of Nutrition and Exercise Sciences, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331, USA.

Abstract

Chronic inflammation and nuclear factor-kappa B (NFκB) have been implicated in prostate cancer development; thus, dietary factors that inhibit NFκB may serve as effective chemo-preventative agents. Prostate cancer risk is significantly lower in Asian countries compared to the United States, which has prompted interest in the potential chemopreventative action of Asian dietary components such as soy and green tea. This study examined the effects of dietary soy and tea on NFκB activation and inflammation in vivo using a hormone-induced rat model for prostate cancer. Male Noble rats implanted with estradiol and testosterone were divided into 4 dietary groups: control, soy, tea, or soy+tea. NFκB activation and inflammatory cytokines were measured post implantation. The combination of soy and tea suppressed NFκB p50 binding activity and protein levels via induction of IκBα. Soy and tea also decreased prostate inflammatory infiltration, increased Bax/BcL2 ratio and decreased protein expression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-1β compared to control. Soy and tea attenuated prostate malignancy by decreasing prostate hyperplasia. These effects were not apparent in groups treated with soy or tea alone. The ongoing in vivo studies thus far suggest that combination of foods, such as soy and tea, may inhibit hormone-induced proinflammatory NFκB signals that contribute to prostate cancer development.

Published by Elsevier Inc.

PMID:
20801632
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2995825
Free PMC Article

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