Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Neuropsychologia. 2010 Oct;48(12):3634-41. doi: 10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2010.08.020. Epub 2010 Aug 26.

Occupation attributes relate to location of atrophy in frontotemporal lobar degeneration.

Author information

  • 1Rotman Research Institute, Baycrest Centre, Toronto, ON, Canada. nathan.spreng@gmail.com

Abstract

Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) often presents with asymmetric atrophy. We assessed whether premorbid occupations in FTLD patients were associated with these hemispheric asymmetries. In a multi-center chart review of 588 patients, occupation information was related to location of tissue loss or dysfunction. Patients with atrophy lateralized to the right had professions more dependent on verbal abilities than patients with left-lateralized or symmetrical atrophy. In a subgroup of 96 well-characterized patients with quantified neuroimaging data, the lateralization effect was localized to the temporal lobes and included verbal and mathematical ability. Patients whose professions placed high demands on language and mathematics had relatively preserved left temporal relative to right temporal volumes. Thus, occupation selection occurring in early adulthood is related to lateralized brain asymmetry in patients who develop FTLD decades later in the relatively deficient hemisphere. The finding suggests that verbal and mathematical occupations may have been pursued due to developmental right-lateralized functional impairment that precedes the neurodegenerative process. Alternatively, long-term engagement of activities associated with these occupations contributed to left-lateralized reserve, right-lateralized dysfunction, or both.

Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

PMID:
20800604
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2957479
Free PMC Article

Images from this publication.See all images (2)Free text

Figure 1
Figure 2
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk