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HIV Clin Trials. 2010 May-Jun;11(3):156-62. doi: 10.1310/hct1103-156.

Prevalence of cardiac diastolic dysfunction in HIV-infected patients: results of the HIV-HEART study.

Author information

  • 1Department of Cardiology, West-German Heart Center, University of Essen, Essen, Germany. nico.reinsch@uk-essen.de

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Antiretroviral therapy has improved the prognosis for many individuals with HIV infection. Consequently, HIV infection has become a chronic and manageable disease with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Isolated diastolic dysfunction (DD) may be the first indication of underlying cardiac disease and an early marker of coronary artery disease. Our aim was to assess the prevalence of DD in HIV-infected patients.

METHODS:

In this cross-sectional cohort study, 698 unselected patients were included. All subjects underwent two-dimensional transthoracic echocardiography with tissue Doppler imaging.

RESULTS:

The prevalence of DD among the HIV-infected patients was 48%. Patients with DD were characterized by older age, higher body mass index, higher total cholesterol, arterial hypertension, and diabetes mellitus. Diabetes mellitus and arterial hypertension were associated with approximately four times the risk for DD (odds ratio [OR] 3.9, 95% CI 1.65-9.17; OR 3.8, 95% CI 2.49-5.71, respectively). Persons with hyperlipidemia were approximately one and a half times more likely to have DD than those without hyperlipidemia (OR 1.5, 95% CI 1.12-2.07).

CONCLUSIONS:

In our study, an impressive high prevalence of DD in HIV-infected patients was demonstrated. Traditional cardiovascular risk factors substantially contributed to the development of DD in the HIV-infected cohort.

PMID:
20739268
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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