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Clin Cancer Res. 2010 Sep 1;16(17):4446-51. doi: 10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-10-0663. Epub 2010 Aug 24.

Inconsistent labeling of food effect for oral agents across therapeutic areas: differences between oncology and non-oncology products.

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  • 1Department of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Several recent oral oncology drugs were labeled for administration in fasted states despite the fact that food increases their bioavailability. Because this was inconsistent with the principles of oral drug delivery, we hypothesized that there were inconsistencies across therapeutic areas.

EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN:

Oral agents approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration from January 2000 to May 2009 were included in our study. Comparison of the food labeling patterns between oncology and non-oncology drugs was made using Fisher's exact test.

RESULTS:

Of the 99 drugs evaluated, 34 showed significant food effects on bioavailability. When food markedly enhanced bioavailability, eight out of nine non-oncology drugs were labeled "fed" to take advantage of the food-drug interaction, whereas all oncology drugs (n = 3) were labeled to be administered in "fasted" states (Fisher's exact test, P = 0.01).

CONCLUSIONS:

Drug labeling patterns with respect to food-drug interactions observed with oncology drugs are in contradiction with fundamental pharmacologic principles, as exemplified in the labeling of non-oncology drugs. .

PMID:
20736327
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2932769
Free PMC Article
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