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J Infect. 2010 Nov;61(5):399-402. doi: 10.1016/j.jinf.2010.08.003. Epub 2010 Aug 21.

Prevalence of G6PD deficiency in a large cohort of HIV-infected patients.

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  • 1Section of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine and Thomas Street Health Center, Harris County Hospital District, Houston, TX 77030, United States. jaserpaa@bcm.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is the most common human enzyme defect. Screening for this condition in HIV-infected patients from susceptible ethnic groups is recommended based on expert opinion. Here we determined the prevalence of G6PD deficiency and the occurrence of G6PD-related hemolytic events in a large cohort of patients.

METHODS:

We identified all HIV-infected adults who presented as new patients at a single urban HIV clinic between 02/01/2007 and 01/31/2009. Demographic and laboratory data including G6PD results were collected. In addition, outpatient and inpatient medical records of G6PD deficient patients were reviewed for episodes of hemolytic anemia.

RESULTS:

A total of 1172 patients were identified and G6PD testing was performed in 1110 (94.7%). Overall, 75 (6.8%) subjects had G6PD deficiency. Rates were higher among African Americans (68/699; 9.7%) and Hispanics (5/253; 2.0%). Only one non-Hispanic White subject had G6PD deficiency (1/153; 0.7%). At baseline, hemoglobin concentrations were similar among subjects with or without G6PD deficiency. Among patients with G6PD deficiency, 40 (53.3%) were prescribed trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole or dapsone. During follow-up, five (6.7%) of these patients developed acute hemolytic anemia.

DISCUSSION:

These results provide strong clinical evidence for recommending G6PD testing in HIV-infected subjects from susceptible ethnic backgrounds.

Copyright © 2010 The British Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

PMID:
20732351
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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