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Transfusion. 2011 Feb;51(2):338-43. doi: 10.1111/j.1537-2995.2010.02816.x. Epub 2010 Aug 17.

Incidence and transfusion risk factors for transfusion-associated circulatory overload among medical intensive care unit patients.

Author information

  • 1Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Mayo Epidemiology and Translational Research in Intensive Care, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA. li.guangxi@mayo.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Transfusion-associated circulatory overload (TACO) is a frequent complication of blood transfusion. Investigations identifying risk factors for TACO in critically ill patients are lacking.

STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS:

We performed a 2-year prospective cohort study of consecutive patients receiving blood product transfusion in the medical intensive care unit (ICU) of the tertiary care institution. Patients were followed for development of transfusion-related complications. TACO was defined as acute hydrostatic pulmonary edema occurring within 6 hours of transfusion. In a nested case-control design, transfusion characteristics were compared between cases (TACO) and controls after matching by age, sex, and ICU admission diagnostic category. In a secondary analysis, patient characteristics before transfusion were compared between cases (TACO) and randomly selected controls.

RESULTS:

Fifty-one of 901 (6%) transfused patients developed TACO. Compared with matched controls, TACO cases had a more positive fluid balance (1.4 L vs. 0.8 L, p = 0.003), larger amount of plasma transfused (0.4 L vs. 0.07 L, p = 0.007), and faster rate of blood component transfusion (225 mL/hr vs. 168 mL/hr, p = 0.031). In a secondary analysis comparing TACO cases and random controls, left ventricular dysfunction before transfusion (odds ratio [OR], 8.23; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.36-21.97) and plasma ordered for the reversal of anticoagulant (OR, 4.31; 95% CI, 1.45-14.30) were significantly related to the development of TACO.

CONCLUSION:

Volume of transfused plasma and the rate of transfusion were identified as transfusion-specific risk factors for TACO. Left ventricular dysfunction and fresh-frozen plasma ordered for the reversal of anticoagulant were strong predictors of TACO before the onset of transfusion.

© 2010 American Association of Blood Banks.

PMID:
20723173
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3006039
Free PMC Article
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