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Biol Lett. 2011 Feb 23;7(1):67-70. doi: 10.1098/rsbl.2010.0521. Epub 2010 Aug 18.

Ancient death-grip leaf scars reveal ant-fungal parasitism.

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  • 1Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA. dhughes@oeb.harvard.edu

Abstract

Parasites commonly manipulate host behaviour, and among the most dramatic examples are diverse fungi that cause insects to die attached to leaves. This death-grip behaviour functions to place insects in an ideal location for spore dispersal from a dead body following host death. Fossil leaves record many aspects of insect behaviour (feeding, galls, leaf mining) but to date there are no known examples of behavioural manipulation. Here, we document, to our knowledge, the first example of the stereotypical death grip from 48 Ma leaves of Messel, Germany, indicating the antiquity of this behaviour. As well as probably being the first example of behavioural manipulation in the fossil record, these data support a biogeographical parallelism between mid Eocene northern Europe and recent southeast Asia.

PMID:
20719770
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3030878
Free PMC Article

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