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Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2010 Nov;90(2):131-40. doi: 10.1016/j.diabres.2010.07.006. Epub 2010 Aug 13.

DPP-4 inhibitors: what may be the clinical differentiators?

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  • University of Rochester School of Medicine, Rochester, NY 14642, USA. john_gerich@urmc.rochester.edu

Abstract

Attenuation of the prandial incretin effect, mediated by glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP), contributes to hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Since the launch of sitagliptin in 2006, a compelling body of evidence has accumulated showing that dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors, which augment endogenous GLP-1 and GIP levels, represent an important advance in the management of T2DM. Currently, three DPP-4 inhibitors - sitagliptin, vildagliptin and saxagliptin - have been approved in various countries worldwide. Several other DPP-4 inhibitors, including linagliptin and alogliptin, are currently in clinical development. As understanding of, and experience with, the growing number of DPP-4 inhibitors broadens, increasing evidence suggests that the class may offer advantages over other antidiabetic drugs in particular patient populations. The expanding evidence base also suggests that certain differences between DPP-4 inhibitors may prove to be clinically significant. This therapeutic diversity should help clinicians tailor treatment to the individual patient, thereby increasing the proportion that safely attain target HbA(1c) levels, and reducing morbidity and mortality. This review offers an overview of DPP-4 inhibitors in T2DM and suggests some characteristics that may provide clinically relevant differentiators within this class.

Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

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PMID:
20708812
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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