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Prev Med. 2010 Nov;51(5):403-7. doi: 10.1016/j.ypmed.2010.08.002. Epub 2010 Aug 12.

Trends in low-risk lifestyle factors among adults in the United States: findings from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System 1996-2007.

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  • 1Division of Adult and Community Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30341, USA. eford@cdc.gov

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Our objective was to examine recent trends in low-risk lifestyle factors for chronic diseases (not currently smoking, any exercise during the past 30 days, consuming fruits and vegetables ≥5 times per day, and body mass index <25kg/m(2)) among U.S. adults.

METHODS:

We used data from 1,580,220 adults aged ≥18 years who participated in one of seven Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System surveys conducted from 1996 to 2007.

RESULTS:

The age-adjusted percentage of adults meeting all four low-risk lifestyle factors was 8.5% in 1996 and 7.7% in 2007 (p for linear trend <0.001). Significant decreasing trends were noted for men, women, whites, Hispanics, and most age groups. The percentages of participants who were not currently smoking, who had done any exercise during the past 30 days, who reported consuming fruits and vegetables ≥5 times per day, and who had a body mass index <25kg/m(2) were 70.9%, 76.2%, 47.9% and 24.3%, respectively, in 1996 and 77.1%, 80.0%, 37.8%, and 24.5%, respectively, in 2007. Women and whites were more likely than their counterparts to meet all four criteria.

CONCLUSIONS:

From 1996 to 2007, the percentage of U.S. adults meeting all four low-risk lifestyle factors decreased slightly.

Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

PMID:
20708637
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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