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Kaohsiung J Med Sci. 2010 Aug;26(8):428-34. doi: 10.1016/S1607-551X(10)70069-3.

Clinical, radiologic and pathologic characteristics of the Carney triad: a case report and literature review.

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  • 1Department of Surgery, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan.

Abstract

This report describes a patient with a gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) and upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage as initial presentations of the Carney triad, a synchronous or metachronous condition involving gastric leiomyosarcoma, extra-adrenal paraganglioma and pulmonary chondroma. A 26-year-old woman presented with dizziness and several episodes of melena over 3 days. Physical examination revealed pale conjunctiva but normal hemodynamic status. Gastroendoscopy showed one antral submucosal tumor with evidence of an associated bleeder (the bleeder over the mucosal surface of the gastric tumor). An abdominal computed tomography scan showed an antral submucosal tumor, two secondary lesions over segment II/V of the liver and a retroperitoneal tumor. Surgical removal of the tumor and subsequent recovery were uneventful. The gastric GIST with liver metastasis and retroperitoneal paraganglioma were confirmed by pathologic study. The patient was treated with imatinib mesylate for the GIST with liver metastasis, and continued follow-up treatment at our hospital. An abdominal computed tomography scan at 32 months after surgery showed no change in the liver metastatic lesions and no evidence of local recurrence. Another follow-up visit at 33 months after surgery confirmed the stable condition. Of nearly 100 cases reported in the literature, this case is the first to be reported in Taiwan. This case highlights the possibility of this rare syndrome occurring in young female patients with one of the three components of the triad and the need for further diagnostic studies for early identification of tumors when curative surgery is still possible.

Copyright 2010 Elsevier. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

PMID:
20705254
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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