Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Bioinformatics. 2010 Oct 1;26(19):2391-7. doi: 10.1093/bioinformatics/btq453. Epub 2010 Aug 9.

An alignment-free model for comparison of regulatory sequences.

Author information

  • 1MOAC Doctoral Training Centre, Coventry House, University of Warwick, Coventry, CV4 7AL, UK. hashem.koohy@warwick.ac.uk

Abstract

MOTIVATION:

Some recent comparative studies have revealed that regulatory regions can retain function over large evolutionary distances, even though the DNA sequences are divergent and difficult to align. It is also known that such enhancers can drive very similar expression patterns. This poses a challenge for the in silico detection of biologically related sequences, as they can only be discovered using alignment-free methods.

RESULTS:

Here, we present a new computational framework called Regulatory Region Scoring (RRS) model for the detection of functional conservation of regulatory sequences using predicted occupancy levels of transcription factors of interest. We demonstrate that our model can detect the functional and/or evolutionary links between some non-alignable enhancers with a strong statistical significance. We also identify groups of enhancers that are likely to be similarly regulated. Our model is motivated by previous work on prediction of expression patterns and it can capture similarity by strong binding sites, weak binding sites and even the statistically significant absence of sites. Our results support the hypothesis that weak binding sites contribute to the functional similarity of sequences. Our model fills a gap between two families of models: detailed, data-intensive models for the prediction of precise spatio-temporal expression patterns on the one side, and crude, generally applicable models on the other side. Our model borrows some of the strengths of each group and addresses their drawbacks.

AVAILABILITY:

The RRS source code is freely available upon publication of this manuscript: http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/sci/systemsbiology/staff/ott/tools_and_software/rrs.

PMID:
20696736
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for HighWire
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk