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Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2011 Mar;43(3):509-15. doi: 10.1249/MSS.0b013e3181f2589f.

Effects of vibrations on gastrocnemius medialis tissue oxygenation.

Author information

  • 1Human Performance Laboratory, Faculty of Kinesiology, University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada. acoza@kin.ucalgary.ca

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Whole-body vibrations are known to affect muscle activity and tissue oxygenation, but some energetic aspects are still poorly understood. This study investigates the effects of whole-body vibration on gastrocnemius muscle oxygen utilization rate and tissue oxygenation dynamics during exercise.

METHODS:

The effects of vibration on gastrocnemius medialis muscle oxygenation were investigated during a dynamic exercise on a sample of 16 active male subjects (age = 26.3 ± 5.1 yr, mass = 71.2 ± 4.8 kg (mean ± SD)). Both arterially occluded (AO) and nonoccluded (N/O) conditions were investigated. Tissue oxygenation was monitored with a near-infrared spectrometer. Oxygen utilization rate and tissue oxygenation recovery were computed as the slopes of the regression line of the oxygenation decay and recovery, respectively. A fast Fourier transform (FFT) was used to determine the frequency spectrum of the oxygen saturation data. EMG activity was monitored using bipolar EMG electrodes. A windowed root mean square analysis was used to monitor the amplitude of the EMG signal.

RESULTS:

A statistically significant increase of 15% (P < 0.05) in oxygen utilization rate was found for the vibration condition in the AO leg but not in the N/O leg. The oxygenation recovery rate for the vibration condition was 34% higher (P < 0.05) than that for the control condition. A low-frequency periodic oscillation (T ≈ 10 s) in the tissue oxygenation data was determined from the FFT spectrum. A statistically significant decrease in the oscillation frequency was noticed for the vibration condition compared with the control.

CONCLUSIONS:

Vibrations increased the oxygen utilization rate during a dynamic exercise. The oxygenation recovery rate increased with vibrations. The low-frequency oscillation of the oxygenation was attributed to the periodic changes in tissue blood flow, and this seems to be influenced by vibrations.

PMID:
20689452
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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