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Trends Microbiol. 2010 Sep;18(9):388-96. doi: 10.1016/j.tim.2010.06.010. Epub 2010 Aug 3.

BST-2/tetherin: a new component of the innate immune response to enveloped viruses.

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  • 1Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, Harvard Medical School, New England Primate Research Center, One Pine Hill Drives, Southborough, MA 01772, USA. devans@hms.harvard.edu

Abstract

The interferon-inducible, transmembrane protein BST-2 (CD317, tetherin) directly holds fully formed enveloped virus particles to the cells that produce them, inhibiting their spread. BST-2 inhibits members of the retrovirus, filovirus, arenavirus and herpesvirus families. These viruses encode a variety of proteins to degrade BST-2 and/or direct it away from its site of action at the cell surface. Viral antagonism has subjected BST-2 to positive selection, leading to species-specific differences that presented a barrier to the transmission of simian immunodeficiency viruses (SIVs) to humans. This barrier was crossed by HIV-1 when its Vpu protein acquired activity as a BST-2 antagonist. Here, we review this new host-pathogen relationship and discuss its impact on the evolution of primate lentiviruses and the origins of the HIV pandemic.

Published by Elsevier Ltd.

PMID:
20688520
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2956607
Free PMC Article

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