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Mayo Clin Proc. 2010 Aug;85(8):752-7; quiz 757-8. doi: 10.4065/mcp.2010.0138.

Vitamin D deficiency in adults: when to test and how to treat.

Author information

  • 1Division of Endocrinology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905, USA. hurley.daniel@mayo.edu

Abstract

Recent evidence for the nonskeletal effects of vitamin D, coupled with recognition that vitamin D deficiency is common, has revived interest in this hormone. Vitamin D is produced by skin exposed to ultraviolet B radiation or obtained from dietary sources, including supplements. Persons commonly at risk for vitamin D deficiency include those with inadequate sun exposure, limited oral intake, or impaired intestinal absorption. Vitamin D adequacy is best determined by measurement of the 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration in the blood. Average daily vitamin D intake in the population at large and current dietary reference intake values are often inadequate to maintain optimal vitamin D levels. Clinicians may recommend supplementation but be unsure how to choose the optimal dose and type of vitamin D and how to use testing to monitor therapy. This review outlines strategies to prevent, diagnose, and treat vitamin D deficiency in adults.

PMID:
20675513
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2912737
Free PMC Article
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