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Heart Lung Circ. 2010 Nov;19(11):660-4. doi: 10.1016/j.hlc.2010.06.665. Epub 2010 Aug 1.

Heart fatty acid binding protein (H-FABP) as a diagnostic biomarker in patients with acute coronary syndrome.

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  • 1International Centre for Cardiothoracic and Vascular Diseases, Department of Biochemistry, Dr K.M Cherian Heart Foundation (A Unit of Frontier LifeLine Pvt Ltd), R-30C, Ambattur Industrial Estate Road, Mogappair, Chennai 600 101, India.

Abstract

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES:

Diagnosis of myocardial ischaemia at an early stage in the emergency department is often difficult. A recently proposed biomarker, heart fatty acid binding protein (H-FABP) has been found to appear in the circulation superior to that of cardiac troponins in the early hours of acute coronary syndrome. We proposed to evaluate the levels of H-FABP and ascertain its utility as an early biomarker for acute coronary syndrome (ACS).

METHODS AND RESULTS:

The present study was carried out in 485 subjects, of whom 297 were diagnosed as patients with ACS, 89 were diagnosed as non-cardiac chest pain (NCCP) and 99 people served as healthy controls. H-FABP levels were measured in comparison with standard markers such as troponin I and CK-MB in all subjects enrolled in the study. The levels of H-FABP were significantly raised in patients when compared to controls and NCCP (P<0.001). Receiver Operator Characteristic Curve (ROC) analysis showed H-FABP to be a good discriminator between patients with ischaemic heart disease and patients without ischaemic heart disease. The area under the curve was found to be 0.965 with 95% CI (0.945-0.979). The cut-off value above which H-FABP can be considered positive was found to be 17.7ng/ml.

CONCLUSION:

H-FABP is a promising biomarker for the early detection of patients with acute coronary syndrome.

Copyright © 2010 Australasian Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

PMID:
20674495
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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