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Biol Psychiatry. 2010 Sep 15;68(6):578-85. doi: 10.1016/j.biopsych.2010.05.038. Epub 2010 Jul 31.

Genome-wide association-, replication-, and neuroimaging study implicates HOMER1 in the etiology of major depression.

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  • 1Department of Genetic Epidemiology in Psychiatry, Central Institute of Mental Health, Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Germany. marcella.rietschel@zi-mannheim.de

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Genome-wide association studies are a powerful tool for unravelling the genetic background of complex disorders such as major depression.

METHODS:

We conducted a genome-wide association study of 604 patients with major depression and 1364 population based control subjects. The top hundred findings were followed up in a replication sample of 409 patients and 541 control subjects.

RESULTS:

Two SNPs showed nominally significant association in both the genome-wide association study and the replication samples: 1) rs9943849 (p(combined) = 3.24E-6) located upstream of the carboxypeptidase M (CPM) gene and 2) rs7713917 (p(combined) = 1.48E-6), located in a putative regulatory region of HOMER1. Further evidence for HOMER1 was obtained through gene-wide analysis while conditioning on the genotypes of rs7713917 (p(combined) = 4.12E-3). Homer1 knockout mice display behavioral traits that are paradigmatic of depression, and transcriptional variants of Homer1 result in the dysregulation of cortical-limbic circuitry. This is consistent with the findings of our subsequent human imaging genetics study, which revealed that variation in single nucleotide polymorphism rs7713917 had a significant influence on prefrontal activity during executive cognition and anticipation of reward.

CONCLUSION:

Our findings, combined with evidence from preclinical and animal studies, suggest that HOMER1 plays a role in the etiology of major depression and that the genetic variation affects depression via the dysregulation of cognitive and motivational processes.

2010 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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PMID:
20673876
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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