Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
HPB (Oxford). 2010 Aug;12(6):427-33. doi: 10.1111/j.1477-2574.2010.00198.x.

Long-term survival after surgical management of neuroendocrine hepatic metastases.

Author information

  • 1Department of Surgical Oncology, The University of Texas M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Surgical cytoreduction and endocrine blockade are important options for care for neuroendocrine liver metastases. We investigated the long-term survival of patients surgically treated for hepatic neuroendocrine metastases.

METHODS:

Patients (n= 172) undergoing operations for neuroendocrine liver metastases from any primary were identified from a prospective liver database. Recorded data and medical record review were used to analyse the type of procedure, length of hospital stay, peri-operative morbidity, tumour recurrence, progression,and survival.

RESULTS:

The median age was 56.8 years (range 11.5-80.7 years). 48.3% of patients were female. Median overall survival was 9.6 years (range 89 days to 22 years). On multivariate analysis, lung/thymic primaries were associated with worse survival [hazard ratio (HR): 15.6, confidence interval (CI): 4.3-56.8, P= 0.002]. Severe post-operative complications were also associated with worse long-term survival (P < 0.001). A positive resection margin status (R1) was not associated with a worse overall survival probability (P approximately 0.8).

DISCUSSION:

Early and aggressive surgical management of hepatic metastases from neuroendocrine tumours is associated with significant long-term survival rates. Radiofrequency ablation is a reasonable option if a lesion is unresectable. R1 resections, unlike many other cancers, are not associated with a worse overall survival.

PMID:
20662794
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3028584
Free PMC Article

Images from this publication.See all images (2)Free text

Figure 2
Figure 1
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Blackwell Publishing Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk