Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Neurosci. 2010 Jul 21;30(29):9831-9. doi: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.6194-09.2010.

Synergistic effects of long-term antioxidant diet and behavioral enrichment on beta-amyloid load and non-amyloidogenic processing in aged canines.

Author information

  • 1Institute for Brain Aging and Dementia, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, California 92697-4540, USA.

Abstract

A long-term intervention (2.69 years) with an antioxidant diet, behavioral enrichment, or the combined treatment preserved and improved cognitive function in aged canines. Although each intervention alone provided cognitive benefits, the combination treatment was additive. We evaluate the hypothesis that antioxidants, enrichment, or the combination intervention reduces age-related beta-amyloid (Abeta) neuropathology, as one mechanism mediating observed functional improvements. Measures assessed were Abeta neuropathology in plaques, biochemically extractable Abeta(40) and Abeta(42) species, soluble oligomeric forms of Abeta, and various proteins in the beta-amyloid precursor protein (APP) processing pathway. The strongest and most consistent effects on Abeta pathology were observed in animals receiving the combined antioxidant and enrichment treatment. Specifically, Abeta plaque load was significantly decreased in several brain regions, soluble Abeta(42) was decreased selectively in the frontal cortex, and a trend for lower Abeta oligomer levels was found in the parietal cortex. Reductions in Abeta may be related to shifted APP processing toward the non-amyloidogenic pathway, because alpha-secretase enzymatic activity was increased in the absence of changes in beta-secretase activity. Although enrichment alone had no significant effects on Abeta, reduced Abeta load and plaque maturation occurred in animals receiving antioxidants as a component of treatment. Abeta measures did not correlate with cognitive performance on any of the six tasks assessed, suggesting that modulation of Abeta alone may be a relatively minor mechanism mediating cognitive benefits of the interventions. Overall, the data indicate that multidomain treatments may be a valuable intervention strategy to reduce neuropathology and improve cognitive function in humans.

PMID:
20660265
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3769160
Free PMC Article

Images from this publication.See all images (6)Free text

Figure 1
Figure 2
Figure 3
Figure 4
Figure 5
Figure 6
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for HighWire Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk