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Arch Suicide Res. 2010;14(3):206-21. doi: 10.1080/13811118.2010.494133.

Bullying, cyberbullying, and suicide.

Author information

  • 1Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice, Florida Atlantic University, Jupiter, Florida 33458-2906, USA. hinduja@fau.edu

Abstract

Empirical studies and some high-profile anecdotal cases have demonstrated a link between suicidal ideation and experiences with bullying victimization or offending. The current study examines the extent to which a nontraditional form of peer aggression--cyberbullying--is also related to suicidal ideation among adolescents. In 2007, a random sample of 1,963 middle-schoolers from one of the largest school districts in the United States completed a survey of Internet use and experiences. Youth who experienced traditional bullying or cyberbullying, as either an offender or a victim, had more suicidal thoughts and were more likely to attempt suicide than those who had not experienced such forms of peer aggression. Also, victimization was more strongly related to suicidal thoughts and behaviors than offending. The findings provide further evidence that adolescent peer aggression must be taken seriously both at school and at home, and suggest that a suicide prevention and intervention component is essential within comprehensive bullying response programs implemented in schools.

PMID:
20658375
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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