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Ann Intern Med. 2010 Jul 20;153(2):121-5. doi: 10.7326/0003-4819-153-2-201007200-00008.

Open notes: doctors and patients signing on.

Author information

  • 1Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Brookline, Massachusetts 02215, USA. tdelbanc@bidmc.harvard.edu.

Abstract

Few patients read their doctors' notes, despite having the legal right to do so. As information technology makes medical records more accessible and society calls for greater transparency, patients' interest in reading their doctors' notes may increase. Inviting patients to review these notes could improve understanding of their health, foster productive communication, stimulate shared decision making, and ultimately lead to better outcomes. Yet, easy access to doctors' notes could have negative consequences, such as confusing or worrying patients and complicating rather than improving patient-doctor communication. To gain evidence about the feasibility, benefits, and harms of providing patients ready access to electronic doctors' notes, a team of physicians and nurses have embarked on a demonstration and evaluation of a project called OpenNotes. The authors describe the intervention and share what they learned from conversations with doctors and patients during the planning stages. The team anticipates that "open notes" will spread and suggests that over time, if drafted collaboratively and signed by both doctors and patients, they might evolve to become contracts for care.

Comment in

PMID:
20643992
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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