Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
Ann Intern Med. 2010 Jul 20;153(2):90-8. doi: 10.7326/0003-4819-153-2-201007200-00005.

Narrative review: the systemic capillary leak syndrome.

Author information

  • 1National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, and Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota 20892, USA. kdruey@niaid.nih.gov

Abstract

The systemic capillary leak syndrome (SCLS) is a rare disease of reversible plasma extravasation and vascular collapse accompanied by hemoconcentration and hypoalbuminemia. Its cause is unknown, although it is believed to be a manifestation of transient endothelial dysfunction due to endothelial contraction, apoptosis, injury, or a combination of these. Fewer than 150 cases of SCLS have been reported, but the condition is probably underrecognized because of its nonspecific symptoms and signs and high mortality rate. Patients experience shock and massive edema, often after a nonspecific prodrome of weakness, fatigue, and myalgias, and are at risk for ischemia-induced organ failure, rhabdomyolysis and muscle compartment syndromes, and venous thromboembolism. Shock and edema reverse almost as quickly as they begin, at which time patients are at risk for death from flash pulmonary edema during rapid fluid remobilization. Diagnosis is made clinically and by exclusion of other diseases that cause similar symptoms and signs, most notably sepsis, anaphylaxis, and angioedema. Acute episodes are treated with vasopressor therapy and judicious fluid replacement, possibly with colloid solutions for their osmotic effects, to prevent the sequelae of underperfusion. Between episodes, patients may be treated with theophylline and terbutaline, which clinical experience suggests may reduce the severity and frequency of acute episodes. Prognosis is uncertain, but patients who survive an initial severe SCLS episode are estimated to have a 10-year survival rate greater than 70%. Much remains to be learned about SCLS, and clinicians should consider the diagnosis in patients with unexplained edema, increased hematocrit, and hypotension.

Comment in

PMID:
20643990
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3017349
Free PMC Article

Images from this publication.See all images (1)Free text

Figure 1
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Icon for Silverchair Information Systems Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk