Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
Child Dev. 2010 Jul-Aug;81(4):1096-113. doi: 10.1111/j.1467-8624.2010.01456.x.

Posttraumatic resilience in former Ugandan child soldiers.

Author information

  • 1Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University Medical Center Hamburg, Martinistrasse 52, 20246 Hamburg, Germany. f.klasen@uke.uni-hamburg.de

Abstract

The present research examines posttraumatic resilience in extremely exposed children and adolescents based on interviews with 330 former Ugandan child soldiers (age = 11-17, female = 48.5%). Despite severe trauma exposure, 27.6% showed posttraumatic resilience as indicated by the absence of posttraumatic stress disorder, depression, and clinically significant behavioral and emotional problems. Among these former child soldiers, posttraumatic resilience was associated with lower exposure to domestic violence, lower guilt cognitions, less motivation to seek revenge, better socioeconomic situation in the family, and more perceived spiritual support. Among the youth with significant psychopathology, many of them had symptoms extending beyond the criteria for posttraumatic stress disorder, in keeping with the emerging concept of developmental trauma disorder. Implications for future research, intervention, and policy are discussed.

PMID:
20636684
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Icon for Blackwell Publishing
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk