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J Card Fail. 2010 Jul;16(7):572-8. doi: 10.1016/j.cardfail.2010.01.006. Epub 2010 Mar 19.

Depressive symptoms affect the relationship of N-terminal pro B-type natriuretic peptide to cardiac event-free survival in patients with heart failure.

Author information

  • 1Department of Nursing, University of Ulsan, Ulsan, Republic of Korea. gracesong@ulsan.ac.kr

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Both N-terminal pro B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-pro BNP) and depressive symptoms independently predict cardiac events in heart failure (HF) patients. However, the relationship among NT-pro BNP, depressive symptoms, and cardiac event is unknown.

METHODS AND RESULTS:

Blood was drawn to measure NT-pro BNP and depressive symptoms were measured by the Patient Health Questionnaire 9 (PHQ-9) among 210 patients with HF. Data about cardiac event-free survival were collected for the average follow-up period of 397 days. Cox proportional hazards regression with survival curves were used to determine the relationship of NT-pro BNP and depressive symptoms to cardiac event-free survival. Higher NT-pro-BNP confers greater risk of cardiac events among those with depressive symptoms than those without depressive symptoms (P for the interaction = .029). Patients with NT-pro BNP > 581 pg/mL and total PHQ-9 score >/= 10 had a 5.5 times higher risk for cardiac events compared with patients with NT-pro BNP </= 581 pg/mL and total PHQ-9 score < 10 (P = .001).

CONCLUSIONS:

The prognostic association of NT-pro BNP with cardiac event-free survival in patients with HF differed by the presence of depressive symptoms. Monitoring and treatment of depressive symptoms may be important for improving cardiac event-free survival in patients with HF.

Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

PMID:
20610233
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2901242
Free PMC Article
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