Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Clin Densitom. 2010 Jul-Sep;13(3):277-82. doi: 10.1016/j.jocd.2010.04.003.

Contribution of serum inflammatory markers to changes in bone mineral content and density in postmenopausal women: a 1-year investigation.

Author information

  • 1US Department of Agriculture, ARS, Western Human Nutrition Research Center, Davis, CA, USA.

Abstract

Bone formation and resorption are influenced by inflammatory processes. We examined the relationships among inflammatory markers and bone mineral content (BMC) and density (BMD) and determined the contribution of inflammatory markers to 1-yr changes in BMC and BMD in healthy postmenopausal women. This analysis included 242 women at baseline from our parent Soy Isoflavones for Reducing Bone Loss project who were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 treatment groups: placebo, 80 mg/d soy isoflavones, or 120 mg/d soy isoflavones. BMD and BMC from the lumbar spine (LS), total proximal femur (hip), and whole body were measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry and the 4% distal tibia by peripheral quantitative computed tomography. Serum inflammatory markers (C-reactive protein, interleukin [IL]-1 beta, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha [TNF-alpha], and white blood cell count [WBC]) were measured at baseline, 6, and 12 mo. Because of attrition or missing values, data analysis at 12 mo includes only 235 women. Significant associations among IL-6, TNF-alpha, and WBC were observed with percent change in LS, hip, and whole body BMC and BMD. Multiple regression analysis indicated that in combination inflammatory markers accounted for 1.1-6.1% of the variance to the observed 12-mo changes in BMC and BMD. Our results suggest that modifying inflammatory markers, even in healthy postmenopausal women, may possibly reduce bone loss.

PMID:
20605499
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2912969
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk