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Neuroimage. 2010 Dec;53(4):1256-63. doi: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2010.06.064. Epub 2010 Jul 13.

Dissociation of processing of featural and spatiotemporal information in the infant cortex.

Author information

  • 1Department of Psychology, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843, USA. tgw@psyc.tamu.edu

Abstract

A great deal is known about the development of visual object processing capacities and the neural structures that mediate these capacities in the mature observer. In contrast, little is known about the neural structures that mediate these capacities in the infant or how these structures eventually give rise to mature processing. The present research used near-infrared spectroscopy to investigate neural activation in visual, temporal, and parietal cortex during object processing tasks. Infants aged 5-7 months viewed visual events that required processing of the featural (Experiment 1) or the spatiotemporal (Experiment 2) properties of objects. In Experiment 1, different patterns of neural were obtained in temporal cortex in response to shape than color information. In Experiment 2, different patterns of neural activation were obtained in parietal cortex in response to spatiotemporal (speed and path of motion) than featural (shape and color) information. These results suggest a dissociation of processing of featural and spatiotemporal information in the infant cortex and provide evidence for early functional specification of the human brain. The outcome of these studies informs brain-behavior models of cognitive development and lays the foundation for systematic investigation of the functional maturation of object processing systems in the infant brain.

Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

PMID:
20603218
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2950116
Free PMC Article

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