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Psychiatr Serv. 2010 Jul;61(7):663-8. doi: 10.1176/appi.ps.61.7.663.

An examination of premature mortality among decedents with serious mental illness and those in the general population.

Author information

  • 1Department of Behavioral and Community Health Sciences, NortheasternOhio Universities Colleges of Medicine and Pharmacy, 4209 State Route 44, Rootstown, OH 44272, USA. lpiatt@neoucom.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

The primary aim of this retrospective study of death records was to determine whether there were significant differences in years of potential life lost (YPLL) between decedents with serious and persistent mental illness at a community mental health center (N=647) and decedents in the general population (N=15,517) after the analysis adjusted for sociodemographic factors and cause of death.

METHODS:

Clinical case management files from a community mental health center were matched to state death records from 1998 to 2004 to identify decedents being treated for a serious and persistent mental illness. Differences in leading causes of death and YPLL were calculated with descriptive and multivariate methods.

RESULTS:

Mean+/-SD YPLL for the decedents with serious and persistent mental illness was 14.5+/-10.6, compared with 10.3+/-6.7 for the general population. Heart disease was the leading cause of death for both groups. Mean differences in YPLL after adjustment for gender, race, marital status, and education ranged from 1.7 years for chronic lower respiratory disease to 13.1 years for accidents and were significant for every leading cause of death. Differences in cause of death did not explain the difference in YPLL. Suicide, cancer, accidents, liver disease, and septicemia were differentially associated with YPLL for persons with serious and persistent mental illness.

CONCLUSIONS:

Suicide, cancer, accidents, liver disease, and septicemia increased premature mortality among persons with serious and persistent mental illness. Along with ongoing suicide prevention programs, efforts to integrate primary and psychiatric care should focus on these preventable causes of early death.

PMID:
20592000
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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