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Nutrition. 2011 Apr;27(4):451-5. doi: 10.1016/j.nut.2010.04.001. Epub 2010 Jul 1.

Low-dose creatine supplementation enhances fatigue resistance in the absence of weight gain.

Author information

  • 1Department of Exercise Science, Bloomsburg University, Bloomsburg, Pennsylvania, USA. erawson@bloomu.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

We examined the effects of 6 wk of low-dose creatine supplementation on body composition, muscle function, and body creatine retention.

METHODS:

Twenty healthy men and women (21 ± 2 y old) were randomized to receive creatine (0.03 g · kg(-1) · d(-1); n = 10, 4 women) or placebo (n = 10, 4 women) for 6 wk in a double-blind placebo-controlled fashion. Participants were tested on two occasions before supplementation to establish a reliable baseline, and then were retested after supplementation. Testing included body composition, maximal strength (three-repetition maximal concentric knee extension at 180 degrees/s), muscle fatigue (five sets of 30 concentric knee extensions at 180 degrees/s), and plasma creatine concentration.

RESULTS:

There were no significant differences in body mass, fat-free mass, fat mass, body fat percentage, total body water, or maximal strength in either group from before to after supplementation (all P > 0.05). After supplementation, plasma creatine increased significantly in the creatine group (+182%, P = 0.03), with no difference in the placebo group. Compared with baseline values, creatine-supplemented volunteers were more resistant to fatigue during sets 2 (7%), 3 (9%), 4 (9%), and 5 (11%) (all P < 0.05). In placebo-supplemented participants, there was no improvement in fatigue resistance during sets 2 (0%), 3 (1%), 4 (0%), and 5 (-1%) (all P > 0.05).

CONCLUSION:

Ingesting a low dose (≈2.3 g/d) of creatine for 6 wk significantly increased plasma creatine concentration and enhanced resistance to fatigue during repeated bouts of high-intensity contractions.

Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

PMID:
20591625
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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