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PLoS One. 2010 Jun 23;5(6):e11279. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0011279.

Connective tissue growth factor in regulation of RhoA mediated cytoskeletal tension associated osteogenesis of mouse adipose-derived stromal cells.

Author information

  • 1Hagey Pediatric Regenerative Medicine Laboratory, Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, United States of America.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Cytoskeletal tension is an intracellular mechanism through which cells convert a mechanical signal into a biochemical response, including production of cytokines and activation of various signaling pathways.

METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS:

Adipose-derived stromal cells (ASCs) were allowed to spread into large cells by seeding them at a low-density (1,250 cells/cm(2)), which was observed to induce osteogenesis. Conversely, ASCs seeded at a high-density (25,000 cells/cm(2)) featured small cells that promoted adipogenesis. RhoA and actin filaments were altered by changes in cell size. Blocking actin polymerization by Cytochalasin D influenced cytoskeletal tension and differentiation of ASCs. To understand the potential regulatory mechanisms leading to actin cytoskeletal tension, cDNA microarray was performed on large and small ASCs. Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) was identified as a major regulator of osteogenesis associated with RhoA mediated cytoskeletal tension. Subsequently, knock-down of CTGF by siRNA in ASCs inhibited this osteogenesis.

CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE:

We conclude that CTGF is important in the regulation of cytoskeletal tension mediated ASC osteogenic differentiation.

PMID:
20585662
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2890586
Free PMC Article
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