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Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2010 Jul 6;107(27):12107-9. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1003187107. Epub 2010 Jun 21.

Expert credibility in climate change.

Author information

  • 1Department of Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA. anderegg@stanford.edu

Abstract

Although preliminary estimates from published literature and expert surveys suggest striking agreement among climate scientists on the tenets of anthropogenic climate change (ACC), the American public expresses substantial doubt about both the anthropogenic cause and the level of scientific agreement underpinning ACC. A broad analysis of the climate scientist community itself, the distribution of credibility of dissenting researchers relative to agreeing researchers, and the level of agreement among top climate experts has not been conducted and would inform future ACC discussions. Here, we use an extensive dataset of 1,372 climate researchers and their publication and citation data to show that (i) 97-98% of the climate researchers most actively publishing in the field surveyed here support the tenets of ACC outlined by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, and (ii) the relative climate expertise and scientific prominence of the researchers unconvinced of ACC are substantially below that of the convinced researchers.

Comment in

  • Climate denier, skeptic, or contrarian? [Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2010]
  • Regarding Anderegg et al. and climate change credibility. [Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2010]
  • Expert credibility and truth. [Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2010]
PMID:
20566872
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2901439
Free PMC Article

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