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Vaccine. 2010 Jul 12;28(31):4895-902. doi: 10.1016/j.vaccine.2010.05.031. Epub 2010 May 27.

The 2009 A (H1N1) influenza virus pandemic: A review.

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  • 1University Paris-7 Denis Diderot, 39 rue Seignemartin, 69008, Lyon, France. marc.girard36@wanadoo.fr

Abstract

In March and early April 2009 a new swine-origin influenza virus (S-OIV), A (H1N1), emerged in Mexico and the USA. The virus quickly spread worldwide through human-to-human transmission. In view of the number of countries and communities which were reporting human cases, the World Health Organization raised the influenza pandemic alert to the highest level (level 6) on June 11, 2009. The propensity of the virus to primarily affect children, young adults and pregnant women, especially those with an underlying lung or cardiac disease condition, and the substantial increase in rate of hospitalizations, prompted the efforts of the pharmaceutical industry, including new manufacturers from China, Thailand, India and South America, to develop pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccines. All currently registered vaccines were tested for safety and immunogenicity in clinical trials on human volunteers. All were found to be safe and to elicit potentially protective antibody responses after the administration of a single dose of vaccine, including split inactivated vaccines with or without adjuvant, whole-virion vaccines and live-attenuated vaccines. The need for an increased surveillance of influenza virus circulation in swine is outlined.

Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

PMID:
20553769
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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