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Br J Sports Med. 2011 Dec;45(15):1189-95. doi: 10.1136/bjsm.2009.070896. Epub 2010 Jun 11.

Does a 3-month multidisciplinary intervention improve pain, body composition and physical fitness in women with fibromyalgia?

Author information

  • 1Department of Physical Activity and Sports, University of Granada, Granada, Spain. anellba@ugr.es

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine the effects of a 3-month multidisciplinary intervention on pain (primary outcome), body composition and physical fitness (secondary outcomes) in women with fibromyalgia (FM).

METHODS:

75 women with FM were allocated to a low-moderate intensity 3-month (three times/week) multidisciplinary (pool, land-based and psychological sessions) programme (n=33) or to a usual care group (n=32). The outcome variables were pain threshold, body composition (body mass index and estimated body fat percentage) and physical fitness (30 s chair stand, handgrip strength, chair sit and reach, back scratch, blind flamingo, 8 feet up and go and 6 min walk test).

RESULTS:

The authors observed a significant interaction effect (group*time) for the left (L) and right (R) side of the anterior cervical (p<0.001) and the lateral epicondyle R (p=0.001) tender point. Post hoc analysis revealed that pain threshold increased in the intervention group (positive) in the anterior cervical R (p<0.001) and L (p=0.012), and in the lateral epicondyle R (p=0.010), whereas it decreased (negative) in the anterior cervical R (p<0.001) and L (p=0.002) in the usual care group. There was also a significant interaction effect for chair sit and reach. Post hoc analysis revealed improvement in the intervention group (p=0.002). No significant improvement attributed to the training was observed in the rest of physical fitness or body composition variables.

CONCLUSIONS:

A 3-month multidisciplinary intervention three times/week had a positive effect on pain threshold in several tender points in women with FM. Though no overall improvements were observed in physical fitness or body composition, the intervention had positive effects on lower-body flexibility.

PMID:
20542976
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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