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J Med Microbiol. 2010 Sep;59(Pt 9):1114-22. doi: 10.1099/jmm.0.021170-0. Epub 2010 Jun 3.

Transcriptional activity of the dominant gut mucosal microbiota in chronic inflammatory bowel disease patients.

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  • 1Institute for Clinical Molecular Biology (IKMB), Christian Albrechts University (CAU) Kiel, Schittenhelmstrasse 12, D-24105 Kiel, Germany.

Abstract

Dysbiosis of the gut mucosa-associated microbiota (MAM) plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). To date, dysbiosis only describes the altered composition of the different bacterial populations, but little is known about transcriptional activity, metabolism and the 'live' status of the MAM. In this study we investigated the transcriptional activity of the dominant intestinal bacterial populations in patients with IBD. Colonic mucosal biopsies from patients with active Crohn's disease (CD; n=10), active ulcerative colitis (UC; n=10) and healthy individuals (HI; n=10) were compared by 16S rRNA gene and rRNA profiles using clone libraries with more than 1700 sequenced clones. Bacterial richness was significantly lower in clone libraries based on rRNA compared to those based on the rRNA genes in the CD group (3.01 vs 3.91) and the UC group (3.61 vs 4.15), but showed no difference in HI (3.81 vs 3.85). The qualitative composition of rRNA and rRNA gene clone libraries was significantly different, with the phylum Bacteroidetes being the most active (P<0.01) compared to other populations in all clinical groups. In contrast, Actinobacteria and Firmicutes were inactive in the CD group, while Escherichia sp. were both abundant and active in the CD and UC groups. Most of the phylotypes showing the highest activity index ratios represented less than 1 % of the microbiota. Our findings indicate that specific bacterial populations are activated in IBD patients, while other groups are in an inactive or 'dormant' state. The transcriptional activity points to a more functional role of the intestinal mucosal microbiota and may lead to the identification of therapeutic targets in the active modulation of microbial factors.

PMID:
20522625
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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