Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Surv Ophthalmol. 2010 May-Jun;55(3):284-9.

Blue-blocking IOLs: a complete review of the literature.

Author information

  • 1Ophthalmic Consultants of Boston, and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.

Abstract

Intraocular lenses (IOLs) that block both ultraviolet and blue wavelength light (<500 nm)were introduced in the 1990s. Since then, the potential benefits and harm from blocking blue light has been debated. We report the results of a complete review of all peer-reviewed published studies regarding the impact of blocking the transmission of blue light. Fifty-six published reports on subjects related to blue-blocking lenses including sleep disturbance, visual outcomes, cataract surgery, lens transmittance, sunlight exposure, and macular disease were found in peer reviewed journals from 1962 to 2009. Eleven reports specifically compared visual outcomes between blue-blocking IOLs and nonblue-locking IOLs. Of these, 10 independent studies (10/11, 91%) concluded that there are no significant effects of blue-blocking IOLs on various meters of visual performance including visual acuity, contrast sensitivity, color perception, and photopic, mesopic, and scotopic sensitivities. Only one group of authors reported that the use of blue-blocking IOLs may have detrimental effects on scotopic vision and circadian rhythms. However, the actual clinical significance of these potential negative effects on scotopic vision and on sleep patterns is uncertain. The benefits of blocking the transmission of blue light to the macula and the relationship between progression of age-related macular degeneration remain unclear. However, the published studies clearly state that the use of blue-blocking IOLs is not detrimental in visual acuity, color perception, and contrast sensitivity. The reported potential negative effects on scotopic vision and sleep disturbance appear to be minimal and may not be clinically relevant. (Surv Ophthalmol 55:284--289, 2010. 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.)

PMID:
20499436
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk