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Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol. 2010 Aug;151(2):168-70. doi: 10.1016/j.ejogrb.2010.04.021. Epub 2010 May 21.

Body Mass Index and spontaneous miscarriage.

Author information

  • 1UCD Centre for Human Reproduction, Coombe Women and Infants University Hospital, Dublin 8, Ireland. michael.turner@ucd.ie

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

We compared the incidence of spontaneous miscarriage in women categorised as obese, based on a Body Mass Index (BMI) >29.9 kg/m(2), with women in other BMI categories.

STUDY DESIGN:

In a prospective observational study conducted in a university teaching hospital, women were enrolled at their convenience in the first trimester after a sonogram confirmed an ongoing singleton pregnancy with fetal heart activity present. Maternal height and weight were measured digitally and BMI calculated. Maternal body composition was measured by advanced bioelectrical impedance analysis.

RESULTS:

In 1200 women, the overall miscarriage rate was 2.8% (n=33). The mean gestational age at enrolment was 9.9 weeks. In the obese category (n=217), the miscarriage rate was 2.3% compared with 3.3% in the overweight category (n=329), and 2.3% in the normal BMI group (n=621). There was no difference in the mean body composition parameters, particularly fat mass parameters, between those women who miscarried and those who did not.

CONCLUSIONS:

In women with sonographic evidence of fetal heart activity in the first trimester, the rate of spontaneous miscarriage is low and is not increased in women with BMI>29.9 kg/m(2) compared to women in the normal BMI category.

Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

PMID:
20488611
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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