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J Am Coll Cardiol. 2010 May 25;55(21):2366-72. doi: 10.1016/j.jacc.2009.10.084.

Epicardial ventricular tachycardia ablation a multicenter safety study.

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  • 1Université Bordeaux II, Hôpital Cardiologique du Haut-Lévêque, Bordeaux-Pessac, France. frederic.sacher@chu-bordeaux.fr

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

The aim of this study was to perform a systematic evaluation of safety and midterm complications after epicardial ventricular tachycardia (VT) ablation.

BACKGROUND:

Epicardial VT ablation is increasingly performed, but there is limited information about its safety and midterm complications.

METHODS:

All patients undergoing VT ablation at 3 tertiary care centers between 2001 and 2007 were included in this study. Of 913 VT ablations, 156 procedures (17%) involved epicardial mapping and/or ablation. These were performed in 134 patients (109 men; mean age 56 +/- 15 years) after a previous VT ablation in 115 (86%). The underlying substrates were ischemic cardiomyopathy in 51 patients, nonischemic cardiomyopathy in 39 patients, arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy in 14 patients, and other types of cardiomyopathy in 30 patients.

RESULTS:

Epicardial access was obtained via percutaneous subxiphoid puncture in 136 procedures, by a surgical subxiphoid approach in 14, and during open-heart surgery in 6. Epicardial ablation (mean radiofrequency duration: 13 +/- 12 min; median: 10 min) was performed in 121 of 156 procedures (78%). Twenty patients subsequently required repeat procedures, and the epicardium could be reaccessed in all but 1 patient. A total of 8 (5%) major complications related to pericardial access were observed acutely: 7 epicardial bleeding (>80 cm(3)) and 1 coronary stenosis. After a mean follow-up period of 23 +/- 21 months, 3 delayed complications related to pericardial access were noted: 1 major pericardial inflammatory reaction, 1 delayed tamponade, and 1 coronary occlusion 2 weeks after the procedure.

CONCLUSIONS:

VT ablation required epicardial ablation in 121 of 913 procedures (13%), with a risk of 5% and 2% of acute and delayed major complications related to epicardial access.

Copyright (c) 2010 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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PMID:
20488308
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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