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Psychol Sci. 2010 Jun;21(6):882-9. doi: 10.1177/0956797610370755. Epub 2010 May 5.

Cultural variance in the interpersonal effects of anger in negotiations.

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  • 1INSEAD, INSEAD, Organizational Behavior Area, Boulevard de Constance, 77305 Fontainebleau, France. hajo.adam@insead.edu

Abstract

The current research is the first investigation of how the effects of expressing discrete emotions in negotiations vary across cultures. In a hypothetical negotiation scenario (Study 1) and a computer-mediated negotiation simulation (Study 2), expressing anger (relative to not expressing anger) elicited larger concessions from European American negotiators, but smaller concessions from Asian and Asian American negotiators. A third study provided evidence that this effect is due to different cultural norms about the appropriateness of anger expressions in negotiations: When we explicitly manipulated anger expressions to be appropriate, Asian and Asian American negotiators made larger concessions to the angry opponent, and their concessions were as large as was typical for European American negotiators; when we explicitly manipulated anger expressions to be inappropriate, European American negotiators made smaller concessions to the angry opponent, and their concessions were as small as was typical for Asian and Asian American negotiators. Implications for current understanding of culture, emotions, and negotiations are discussed.

PMID:
20483822
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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