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J Chromatogr A. 2010 Jun 25;1217(26):4383-8. doi: 10.1016/j.chroma.2010.04.056. Epub 2010 Apr 27.

Determination of acrolein and other carbonyls in cigarette smoke using coupled silica cartridges impregnated with hydroquinone and 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine.

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  • 1Department of Environmental Health, National Institute of Public Health, Wako City, Saitama 351-0197, Japan. uchiyama@niph.go.jp

Abstract

A new method for the determination of acrolein and other carbonyls in cigarette smoke using a dual cartridge system has been developed. Each cartridge consists of reagent-impregnated silica particles. The first contains hydroquinone (HQ) for the inhibition of acrolein polymerization, while the second contains 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH) for the derivatization of carbonyls. Smoke samples were firstly drawn through the cartridge containing HQ-impregnated silica (HQ-silica) and then through the DNPH-impregnated silica (DNPH-silica). Acrolein in the sample was completely trapped in the first HQ-silica cartridge. Some other airborne carbonyls were also trapped by the HQ-silica, and those that pass through were trapped in the second DNPH-silica cartridge. Extraction was performed in the reverse direction to air sampling. When solvent was eluted through the dual-cartridges, excess DNPH was washed into the HQ bed where it reacted with acrolein and other trapped carbonyls to form the corresponding hydrazone derivatives. All of the hydrazones derived from airborne carbonyls were completely separated and measured using high-performance liquid chromatography. This HQ-DNPH-method can be applied for the determination of acrolein and other alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes, such as crotonaldehyde, in cigarette smoke.

Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

PMID:
20483418
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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