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Pediatr Neurol. 2010 Jun;42(6):422-6. doi: 10.1016/j.pediatrneurol.2010.03.004.

Prevalence and risk factors for vitamin D insufficiency among children with epilepsy.

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  • 1Division of Pediatric Neurology, Department of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases, Ann Arbor, MI, USA. shellhaa@med.umich.edu

Abstract

This cross-sectional study was designed to determine the prevalence of, and risk factors for, vitamin D insufficiency among children treated for epilepsy in a general pediatric neurology clinic. Included were 78 children with epilepsy, aged 3-17 years, treated by the authors between September 2008 and March 2009. Vitamin D levels and relevant risk factors were evaluated using multiple logistic regression. Of the 78 children, 41% were male and 81% were of European origin; the mean age was 11.64 + or - 4.37 years. 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels of <20 ng/mL were observed in 25% of the children and levels considered to be normal (>32 ng/mL) were observed in only 25%. Girls and children with elevated body mass index were at increased risk for low 25-hydroxyvitamin D. The odds ratio for low 25-hydroxyvitamin D was 4.07 for girls versus boys, with a 95% confidence interval of 1.18-13.97; for each 1-unit increase in body mass index, the odds ratio was 1.179, with a 95% confidence interval of 1.047-1.329. Use of newer antiepileptic drugs was not associated with altered risk, compared with older enzyme-inducing drugs. Vitamin D insufficiency was highly prevalent in this unselected population of children with epilepsy. Female sex and increased body mass index were significant risk factors for low vitamin D levels, but antiepileptic drug regimen was not.

Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

PMID:
20472195
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2872637
Free PMC Article
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