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Sleep. 2010 May;33(5):715-8.

CPAP pressure requirements for obstructive sleep apnea patients at varying altitudes.

Author information

  • 1Department of Medicine, St. Mary's Hospital, Grand Junction, CO, USA. npatz@bresnan.net

Abstract

STUDY OBJECTIVES:

This study was performed to determine whether the obstructive sleep apnea patient who requires a certain CPAP pressure at one altitude requires the same or a different CPAP pressure at a different altitude.

PARTICIPANTS:

7 mountain residents with OSA, comfortably using CPAP and planning to travel to lower altitude.

DESIGN AND SETTING:

Participants used a ResMed Autoset autotitrating CPAP unit for at least 3 days at their home and at each of their lower travel destinations.

MEASUREMENTS:

Nightly CPAP 95th percentile pressure, median CPAP pressure and AHI were recorded.

RESULTS:

At high altitude, 7400 ft. to 10,100 ft (2255 m to 3080 m), average CPAP 95th percentile pressure was 9.43 (+/- 0.12) cm H2O. At low altitude, sea level to 2800 ft. (0-853m), average CPAP 95th percentile pressure was 9.54 (+/- 0.13) cm H2O, P = 0.18. At high altitude, median CPAP pressure was 7.00 (+/- 0.10) cm H2O vs. 7.21 (+/- 0.14) cm. H20 at low altitude, P = 0.54. Three patients had a slight decrease in required pressure at low elevation, 4 had a slight increase.

INTERVENTIONS:

N/A.

CONCLUSIONS:

For obstructive sleep apnea patients living at altitude, changes in elevation between 10,100 ft (3075 m) and sea level do not significantly alter absolute CPAP pressure requirements.

PMID:
20469814
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2864887
Free PMC Article
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