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Mov Disord. 2010 May 15;25(7):877-81. doi: 10.1002/mds.22903.

Restless legs syndrome is a common feature of adult celiac disease.

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  • 1Department of Neurological Sciences, University Federico II and IDC Hermitage Capodimonte, Naples, Italy.

Abstract

Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a common neurological condition, frequently idiopathic, sometimes associated with specific disorders such as iron deficiency. We investigated RLS prevalence in celiac disease (CD), an autoimmune disease characterized by several features such as malabsorption-related iron deficiency anemia and peripheral neuropathy. We screened a population of 100 adult CD patients for CD features, iron metabolism, clinical and neurological conditions, and enrolled 100 age- and sex-matched controls in the general population. RLS was ascertained in CD patients and controls by both the presence of the four essential International RLS Study Group diagnostic criteria and neurological examination. The International RLS Study Group rating scale was used to measure RLS severity. We found a 31% prevalence of RLS in the CD population that was significantly higher than the prevalence in the control population (4%; P < 0.001). The average severity of RLS in CD population was moderate (17 +/- 6.5). In the CD population, no significant correlation was found between RLS and either gluten-free diet or iron metabolism, despite hemoglobin levels were significantly lower in CD patients with RLS than without RLS (P = 0.003). We found no correlation between RLS and other possible causes of secondary RLS, including signs of peripheral neuropathy, pregnancy, end-stage renal disease, and pharmacological treatments.Our study broadens the spectrum of neurological disorders associated with CD and indicates that RLS should be sought for in all patients with CD.

(c) 2010 Movement Disorder Society.

PMID:
20461805
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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