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Arch Neurol. 2010 May;67(5):589-95. doi: 10.1001/archneurol.2010.65.

Impulse control disorders in Parkinson disease: a cross-sectional study of 3090 patients.

Author information

  • 1University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. daniel.weintraub@uphs.upenn.edu

Abstract

CONTEXT:

An association between dopamine-replacement therapies and impulse control disorders (ICDs) in Parkinson disease (PD) has been suggested in preliminary studies.

OBJECTIVES:

To ascertain point prevalence estimates of 4 ICDs in PD and examine their associations with dopamine-replacement therapies and other clinical characteristics.

DESIGN:

Cross-sectional study using an a priori established sampling procedure for subject recruitment and raters blinded to PD medication status.

PATIENTS:

Three thousand ninety patients with treated idiopathic PD receiving routine clinical care at 46 movement disorder centers in the United States and Canada.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

The Massachusetts Gambling Screen score for current problem/pathological gambling, the Minnesota Impulsive Disorders Interview score for compulsive sexual behavior and buying, and Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders research criteria for binge-eating disorder.

RESULTS:

An ICD was identified in 13.6% of patients (gambling in 5.0%, compulsive sexual behavior in 3.5%, compulsive buying in 5.7%, and binge-eating disorder in 4.3%), and 3.9% had 2 or more ICDs. Impulse control disorders were more common in patients treated with a dopamine agonist than in patients not taking a dopamine agonist (17.1% vs 6.9%; odds ratio [OR], 2.72; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.08-3.54; P < .001). Impulse control disorder frequency was similar for pramipexole and ropinirole (17.7% vs 15.5%; OR, 1.22; 95% CI, 0.94-1.57; P = .14). Additional variables independently associated with ICDs were levodopa use, living in the United States, younger age, being unmarried, current cigarette smoking, and a family history of gambling problems.

CONCLUSIONS:

Dopamine agonist treatment in PD is associated with 2- to 3.5-fold increased odds of having an ICD. This association represents a drug class relationship across ICDs. The association of other demographic and clinical variables with ICDs suggests a complex relationship that requires additional investigation to optimize prevention and treatment strategies.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00617019.

PMID:
20457959
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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