Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Am Soc Nephrol. 2010 Jul;21(7):1103-14. doi: 10.1681/ASN.2009090984. Epub 2010 May 6.

IgG glycan hydrolysis attenuates ANCA-mediated glomerulonephritis.

Author information

  • 1Departments of Pathology and Medical Biology, University Medical Center Groningen and University of Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands.

Abstract

Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (ANCA) directed against myeloperoxidase (MPO) and proteinase 3 (Pr3) are considered pathogenic in ANCA-associated necrotizing and crescentic glomerulonephritis (NCGN) and vasculitis. Modulation of ANCA IgG glycosylation may potentially reduce its pathogenicity by abolishing Fc receptor-mediated activation of leukocytes and complement. Here, we investigated whether IgG hydrolysis by the bacterial enzyme endoglycosidase S (EndoS) attenuates ANCA-mediated NCGN. In vitro, treatment of ANCA IgG with EndoS significantly attenuated ANCA-mediated neutrophil activation without affecting antigen-binding capacity. In a mouse model of anti-MPO IgG/LPS-induced NCGN, we induced disease with either unmodified or EndoS-treated (deglycosylated) anti-MPO IgG. In separate experiments, we administered EndoS systemically after disease induction with unmodified anti-MPO IgG. Pretreatment of anti-MPO IgG with EndoS reduced hematuria, leukocyturia, and albuminuria and attenuated both neutrophil influx and formation of glomerular crescents. After inducing disease with unmodified anti-MPO IgG, systemic treatment with EndoS reduced albuminuria and glomerular crescent formation when initiated after 3 but not 24 hours. In conclusion, IgG glycan hydrolysis by EndoS attenuates ANCA-induced neutrophil activation in vitro and prevents induction of anti-MPO IgG/LPS-mediated NCGN in vivo. Systemic treatment with EndoS early after disease induction attenuates the development of disease. Thus, modulation of IgG glycosylation is a promising strategy to interfere with ANCA-mediated inflammatory processes.

PMID:
20448018
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3152232
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Icon for HighWire Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk