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Pediatrics. 2010 Jun;125(6):e1286-93. doi: 10.1542/peds.2009-0555. Epub 2010 May 3.

Patient-, provider-, and clinic-level predictors of unrecognized elevated blood pressure in children.

Author information

  • 1MHS, Johns Hopkins University, David M. Rubenstein Child Health Building, 200 North Wolfe St, Room 3057, Baltimore, MD 21287, USA. tbrady8@jhmi.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The goal was to determine patient-, provider-, and clinic-level predictors of unrecognized elevated blood pressure (BP) in children. We hypothesized that being of healthy weight, having a BP of <120/80 mmHg, and being seen by a less experienced provider would result in decreased recognition.

METHODS:

A cross-sectional study of clinic visits for children 3 to 20 years of age at an urban, pediatric primary care practice between January 1, 2006, and June 30, 2006, was performed. Children with elevated systolic or diastolic BP (> or = 90th percentile or > or = 120/80 mmHg) were included. Recognition was defined as having any of the following documented: repeat BP measurement, elevated-BP/hypertension diagnosis, plan to recheck BP, or initiation of hypertension evaluation. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify characteristics associated with underrecognition.

RESULTS:

Elevated BP occurred in 779 (39%) of 2000 visits. Of 726 cases included in the analysis, 87% were not recognized by providers. Patient-level predictors of underrecognition included systolic BP of <120 mmHg (odds ratio: 7.7 [95% confidence interval: 3.2-18.6]), diastolic BP of <80 mmHg (odds ratio: 2.4 [95% confidence interval: 1.1-5.0]), decreasing BMI z score, male gender, older age, lack of family history of cardiovascular disease, and negative medical history findings. Being seen by a nurse practitioner and being seen by a less-experienced provider also were significant predictors.

CONCLUSIONS:

Most BP elevations were not recognized by providers. Poor recognition was most influenced by the absence of obviously elevated BP, obesity, and family history of cardiovascular disease.

PMID:
20439598
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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