Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
We are sorry, but NCBI web applications do not support your browser and may not function properly. More information
Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol. 2010 Jul;299(1):L3-7. doi: 10.1152/ajplung.90637.2008. Epub 2010 Apr 23.

Plasma biomarker profiles in acute exacerbation of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

Author information

  • 1Department of Medicine, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA.

Abstract

Little is known about the pathobiology of acute exacerbation of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), a condition that shares clinical and histopathological features with acute lung injury. Plasma biomarkers have been well studied in acute lung injury and have provided insight into the underlying disease mechanism. The objective of this study was to determine the plasma biomarker profile of acute exacerbation of IPF and compare this profile with that of stable IPF and acute lung injury. Plasma was collected from patients with stable IPF, acute exacerbation of IPF, and acute lung injury for measurement of biomarkers of cellular activity/injury (receptor for advanced glycation endproducts, surfactant protein D, KL-6, von Willebrand factor), systemic inflammation (IL-6), and coagulation/fibrinolysis (protein C, thrombomodulin, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1). Plasma from patients with acute exacerbation of IPF showed significant elevations in markers of type II alveolar epithelial cell injury and/or proliferation, endothelial cell injury, and coagulation. This profile differed from the biomarker profile in patients with acute lung injury. These findings support the hypothesis that type II alveolar epithelial cells are centrally involved in the pathobiology of acute exacerbation of IPF. Furthermore, they suggest that acute exacerbation of IPF has a distinct plasma biomarker profile from that of acute lung injury.

Comment in

PMID:
20418386
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2904092
Free PMC Article

Images from this publication.See all images (1)Free text

Fig. 1.
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for HighWire Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk