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Am J Prev Med. 2010 May;38(5):551-5. doi: 10.1016/j.amepre.2010.01.019.

Adolescent suicide and health risk behaviors: Rhode Island's 2007 Youth Risk Behavior Survey.

Author information

  • 1Center for Health Data and Analysis, Rhode Island Department of Health, Providence, Rhode Island, USA. Yongwen.Jiang@health.ri.gov

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Suicide is the third-leading cause of death among high school students in the U.S.

PURPOSE:

This study examined the relationships among indicators of depressed mood, suicidal thoughts, suicide attempts, and demographics and risk behaviors in Rhode Island high school students.

METHODS:

Data from Rhode Island's 2007 Youth Risk Behavior Survey were utilized for this study. The statewide sample contained 2210 randomly selected public high school students. Data were analyzed in 2008 to model for each of five depressed mood/suicide indicators using multivariable logistic regression.

RESULTS:

By examining depressed mood and suicide indicators through a multivariable approach, the strongest predictors were identified, for multiple as well as specific suicide indicators. These predictors included being female, having low grades, speaking a language other than English at home, being lesbian/gay/bisexual/unsure of sexual orientation, not going to school as a result of feeling unsafe, having been a victim of forced sexual intercourse, being a current cigarette smoker, and having a self-perception of being overweight.

CONCLUSIONS:

The strength of associations between three factors (immigrant status, feeling unsafe, and having forced sex) and suicide indicators adds new information about potential predictors of suicidal behavior in adolescents.

2010 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

PMID:
20409502
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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