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BMC Pulm Med. 2010 Apr 20;10:20. doi: 10.1186/1471-2466-10-20.

Comparison of the effect of LPS and PAM3 on ventilated lungs.

Author information

  • 1Pathophysiology of Inflammation, Research Center Borstel, Borstel, Germany. hphauber@fz-borstel.de

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

While lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Gram-negative bacteria has been shown to augment inflammation in ventilated lungs information on the effect of Gram-positive bacteria is lacking. Therefore the effect of LPS and a lipopetide from Gram-positive bacteria, PAM3, on ventilated lungs were investigated.

METHODS:

C57/Bl6 mice were mechanically ventilated. Sterile saline (sham) and different concentrations of LPS (1 microg and 5 microg) and PAM3 (50 nM and 200 nM) were applied intratracheally. Lung function parameters and expression of MIP-2 and TNFalpha as well as influx of neutrophils were measured.

RESULTS:

Mechanical ventilation increased resistance and decreased compliance over time. PAM3 but not LPS significantly increased resistance compared to sham challenge (P < 0.05). Both LPS and PAM3 significantly increased MIP-2 and TNFalpha mRNA expression compared to sham challenge (P < 0.05). The numbers of neutrophils were significantly increased after LPS at a concentration of 5 microg compared to sham (P < 0.05). PAM3 significantly increased the numbers of neutrophils at both concentrations compared to sham (P < 0.05).

CONCLUSIONS:

These data suggest that PAM3 similar to LPS enhances ventilator-induced inflammation. Moreover, PAM3 but not LPS increases pulmonary resistance in ventilated lungs. Further studies are warranted to define the role of lipopetides in ventilator-associated lung injury.

PMID:
20403209
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2873469
Free PMC Article

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