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Am J Epidemiol. 2010 May 15;171(10):1144-52. doi: 10.1093/aje/kwq062. Epub 2010 Apr 16.

Cytomegalovirus infection and the risk of mortality and frailty in older women: a prospective observational cohort study.

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  • 1Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21224, USA. gwang7@jhmi.edu

Abstract

Cytomegalovirus (CMV), a prevalent pathogen, causes severe disease in immunocompromised humans. However, present understanding is limited regarding the long-term clinical effect of persistent CMV infection in immunocompetent adults. The authors conducted a prospective observational cohort study (1992-2002) of 635 community-dwelling women in Baltimore, Maryland, aged 70-79 years in the Women's Health and Aging Studies to examine the effect of CMV infection on the risk of frailty, a common geriatric syndrome, and mortality in older women. The effect of baseline serum CMV antibody (immunoglobulin G) concentration on the risk of 3-year incident frailty, defined by using a 5-component measure, and 5-year mortality was examined with Cox proportional hazards models. Compared with those who were CMV seronegative, women in the highest quartile of CMV antibody concentration had a greater incidence of frailty (hazard ratio = 3.46, 95% confidence interval: 1.45, 8.27) and mortality (hazard ratio = 3.81, 95% confidence interval: 1.64, 8.83). After adjustment for potential confounders, CMV antibody concentration in the highest quartile independently increased the risk of 5-year mortality (hazard ratio = 2.79, 95% confidence interval: 1.22, 6.40). Better understanding of the long-term clinical consequences of CMV infection in immunocompetent humans is needed to guide public health efforts for this widely prevalent infection.

PMID:
20400465
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2877470
Free PMC Article
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