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Am J Public Health. 2010 Jun;100(6):1123-9. doi: 10.2105/AJPH.2009.176446. Epub 2010 Apr 15.

Gay and bisexual men's willingness to receive anal Papanicolaou testing.

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  • 1Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

We assessed the willingness of gay and bisexual men, who have high rates of anal cancer that might be prevented through regular screening, to receive anal Papanicolaou tests.

METHODS:

We surveyed a national sample of men aged 18 to 59 years who self-identified as gay (n = 236) or bisexual (n = 70).

RESULTS:

Most respondents were willing to accept free screening (83%), but fewer would pay for the test (31%; McNemar's chi(2) = 158.02; P < .001). Willingness to pay for screening was higher among men who reported greater worry about getting anal cancer (OR [odds ratio] = 1.70; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.06, 2.72), higher perceived likelihood of anal cancer (OR = 1.88; 95% CI = 1.18, 2.99), and higher income (OR = 2.17; 95% CI = 1.18, 3.98), in adjusted analyses. Only 33% (17 of 51) of HIV-positive respondents, who have the highest risk for anal cancer, had received anal Papanicolaou tests.

CONCLUSIONS:

Anal cancer screening was highly acceptable to gay and bisexual men, although cost was a major barrier. Efforts to reduce anal cancer disparities should target beliefs about anal cancer and barriers to anal Papanicolaou testing in this population.

PMID:
20395576
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2866587
Free PMC Article
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