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Am J Clin Nutr. 2010 Jun;91(6):1752-63. doi: 10.3945/ajcn.2009.28415. Epub 2010 Apr 14.

Meat, fish, and ovarian cancer risk: Results from 2 Australian case-control studies, a systematic review, and meta-analysis.

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  • 1Queensland Institute of Medical Research, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Variation in meat and fish intakes has been associated with a risk of some cancers, but evidence for ovarian cancer is limited and inconsistent.

OBJECTIVE:

We examined the association between intakes of total meat, red meat, processed meat, poultry, and fish and ovarian cancer risk.

DESIGN:

Data came from 2 Australian population-based case-control studies conducted 10 y apart. Analyses included a total of 2049 cases and 2191 control subjects. We obtained dietary information via a food-frequency questionnaire. We estimated multivariable-adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for each study by using logistic regression and combined results of the 2 studies by using random-effects models. We also assembled the published evidence in a systematic review and meta-analysis.

RESULTS:

Although there was no association between total or red meat intake and ovarian cancer risk, women with the highest intake of processed meat had a significantly increased risk of ovarian cancer in the 2 case-control studies (combined OR: 1.18; 95% CI: 1.15, 1.21) and the meta-analysis [7 studies; pooled relative risk (RR): 1.20; 95% CI: 1.07, 1.34]. In contrast, a frequent intake of poultry was associated with borderline significant reductions in risk in the 2 case-control studies (combined OR: 0.83; 95% CI: 0.67, 1.03) and the meta-analysis including 7 additional studies (pooled RR: 0.90; 95% CI: 0.79, 1.01). High fish intake was associated with a significantly reduced risk in the 2 case-control studies (combined OR: 0.76; 95% CI: 0.62, 0.94) and a smaller borderline significant reduction in the meta-analysis (6 additional studies; pooled RR: 0.84; 95% CI: 0.68, 1.03).

CONCLUSION:

Our results suggest that low consumption of processed meat and higher consumption of poultry and fish may reduce the risk of ovarian cancer.

PMID:
20392889
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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