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J Nutr. 2010 Jun;140(6):1192S-1204S. doi: 10.3945/jn.110.121830. Epub 2010 Apr 14.

Guidance from an NIH workshop on designing, implementing, and reporting clinical studies of soy interventions.

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  • 1Office of Dietary Supplements, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. kleinm@mail.nih.gov

Abstract

The NIH sponsored a scientific workshop, "Soy Protein/Isoflavone Research: Challenges in Designing and Evaluating Intervention Studies," July 28-29, 2009. The workshop goal was to provide guidance for the next generation of soy protein/isoflavone human research. Session topics included population exposure to soy; the variability of the human response to soy; product composition; methods, tools, and resources available to estimate exposure and protocol adherence; and analytical methods to assess soy in foods and supplements and analytes in biologic fluids and other tissues. The intent of the workshop was to address the quality of soy studies, not the efficacy or safety of soy. Prior NIH workshops and an evidence-based review questioned the quality of data from human soy studies. If clinical studies are pursued, investigators need to ensure that the experimental designs are optimal and the studies properly executed. The workshop participants identified methodological issues that may confound study results and interpretation. Scientifically sound and useful options for dealing with these issues were discussed. The resulting guidance is presented in this document with a brief rationale. The guidance is specific to soy clinical research and does not address nonsoy-related factors that should also be considered in designing and reporting clinical studies. This guidance may be used by investigators, journal editors, study sponsors, and protocol reviewers for a variety of purposes, including designing and implementing trials, reporting results, and interpreting published epidemiological and clinical studies.

PMID:
20392880
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2869505
Free PMC Article
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